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NBA All-Star Weekend grades for dunk contest, Rising Stars, more

It’s NBA All-Star Weekend, but not all the stars will shine equally. To highlight the best and worst performances all weekend long in Indianapolis, we’re grading the participants in every event from the Rising Stars on Friday through Sunday’s All-Star Game.


Skills took center stage on Saturday night during NBA All-Star Weekend, including a one-of-a-kind showdown between WNBA 3-point contest record holder Sabrina Ionescu of the New York Liberty and NBA all-time 3-point leader Stephen Curry of the Golden State Warriors, a two-time NBA 3-point contest winner who shares the single-round NBA record. Curry won with the best round by any player all night long.

Saturday’s events began with the skills challenge. The current format has teams of three compete in an obstacle course, a passing competition and a shooting competition. The hometown Indiana Pacers squad of All-Star Tyrese Haliburton, Rising Stars MVP Bennedict Mathurin and Myles Turner delighted the crowd by becoming the third host team in as many years to win.

In the 3-point contest, defending champion Damian Lillard of the Milwaukee Bucks beat 2022 winner Karl-Anthony Towns and Trae Young in the finals, becoming the first player to repeat since Jason Kapono in 2007 and 2008 and joining Curry as one of just eight players ever to win multiple times.

The action wrapped up with the dunk contest, where Mac McClung won his second straight title over a field featuring All-Star Jaylen Brown of the NBA-best Boston Celtics and rookies Jaime Jaquez Jr. and Jacob Toppin.

Which stars impressed in Indy? Let’s grade every All-Star Saturday night participant.

Jump to grades: Rising Stars | Skills | 3-point | Dunks | Steph vs. Sabrina

ALL-STAR SATURDAY NIGHT

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0:49

Mac McClung completes epic self alley-oop

Mac McClung jumps over someone while tossing himself an alley-oop in midair for his first dunk.


Dunk contest

Mac McClung, Osceola Magic
Grade:
A-

Result: Champion

Analysis
Although McClung was a deserving winner, the thrill of last year’s unexpected victory wasn’t there this time around. McClung set the bar high in 2023, when three of his four dunks scored a perfect 50. This time around, McClung did go out on a strong note with the night’s only 50 for his reverse finish over Shaq — who didn’t duck nearly as much as he did when the taller Jaime Jaquez Jr. dunked over him earlier in the competition.

McClung also dunked over a pair of people (one on the other’s shoulders) in the final, but I most enjoyed his last dunk of the first round. That one saw McClung go up with two hands, then windmill into a reverse finish. McClung’s lowest score came for a dunk that was likely more difficult than it looked, when he let go of the ball midair, then grabbed it again and performed a reverse finish on his second attempt. The crowd booed a score of 48.0.


Jaylen Brown, Boston Celtics
Grade: B-

Result: Runner-up

Analysis
The judging panel seemed more enamored of Brown’s dunks than outside observers were. He reached the finals with a dunk which saw him take a lob from teammate Jayson Tatum and jump over a sitting Kai Cenat (filming for his popular YouTube channel) in what was intended as a tribute to Dee Brown, who won the 1991 dunk contest for the Boston Celtics. Alas, Brown’s effort to cover his eyes as Dee Brown famously did on his final dunk came only after the ball had gone through the net.

A couple of Brown’s dunks, including a pump followed by a windmill that scored a 48.8 and a 360 windmill that scored a 48.6, were the kind occasionally seen during game action. Brown did stir emotions with the latter dunk by paying tribute to the late Terrence Clarke, a Kentucky star who died in a car accident while preparing for the 2021 draft. Brown has called Clarke, who was from the Boston area, “my little brother.”

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0:54

Jaylen Brown jumps over Kai Cenat on second dunk

Jaylen Brown catches a lob from Jayson Tatum while jumping over social media star Kai Cenat for a one-handed dunk.


Jaime Jaquez Jr., Miami Heat
Grade: B-

Result: Eliminated in first round

Analysis
Not really thought of as a dunker, Jaquez showcased his vertical on his opening dunk, leaping a ducking O’Neal — who was filming at the time — and windmilling home. Jaquez’s second dunk, which came with him wearing a “Heat Culture” hat, lacked the same creativity. Jaquez lobbed the ball to himself for what wasn’t quite a 360, drawing the lowest score of the first round after missing his first attempt.


Jacob Toppin, New York Knicks
Grade: B-

Result: Eliminated in first round

Analysis

Toppin, who has seen action in five games for the New York Knicks on a two-way contract as a rookie, incorporated his brother — 2022 dunk contest winner Obi Toppin — into his opening dunk. Toppin grabbed the ball off his brother’s shoulders and finished with a reverse. Toppin’s second dunk, going between his legs for a 360 with two hands, had a higher degree of difficulty than Jaquez’s similar attempt but wasn’t enough to get him to the finals.


Steph vs. Sabrina

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2:45

Steph Curry tops Sabrina Ionescu in 3-point challenge

Steph Curry defeats Sabrina Ionescu in the 3-point challenge on Saturday night.

Stephen Curry
Grade: A
Result: 29 points

It didn’t take long for Curry to remind everybody who’s the best shooter in the building. Although Curry last participated in the 3-point contest in 2021, winning his second title, he’d be favored to beat anyone, anywhere, any time. After making just three of five shots on the opening rack, Curry shot at least 4-of-5 on his remaining four, including perfect marks from both the left and right wings. Needing to make three of five attempts on his final moneyball rack to win, Curry instead hit four to finish two points shy of tying his record for a single round under the current format.


Sabrina Ionescu
Grade: A
Result: 26 points

Despite losing the GOAT shooter belt to Steph, Ionescu acquitted herself well, shooting from the longer NBA 3-point line (using standard WNBA basketballs). Like Curry and Lillard, Ionescu is a threat well beyond the arc, as she showed by starting with 13 makes in her first 15 attempts. Ionescu may have tired a bit from there, making just half of her final 10 shots, but still matched any round from the 3-point contest. The ultimate takeaway: No matter the league, shooters shoot.


3-point contest

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2:09

Dame Time wins back-to-back 3-point contests

Damian Lillard defeats Trae Young and Karl-Anthony Towns in the final round of the 3-point contest.

Malik Beasley, Milwaukee Bucks
Grade: C+
Result: Eliminated in first round (20)

Under ordinary circumstances, you’d expect somebody to come up short of 20 points in the opening round of the 3-point contest. Beasley hit more than half his shots, including a deep 3, but came in last in large part because he went just 2-of-5 from his moneyball rack on the right wing.


Jalen Brunson, New York Knicks
Grade: B
Result: Eliminated in first round (24)

After a slow start, Brunson was agonizingly close to being part of the tiebreaker, needing just one more make on his money rack to tie the top score of 26. Starting in the left corner as the only southpaw in the competition, Brunson went 1-of-5 on that rack but made all five of his attempts from the top of the key and one of the deep shots.


Tyrese Haliburton, Indiana Pacers
Grade: B+

Result: Eliminated in first-round tiebreaker (26/12)

Give the NBA’s tiebreaker format an F. Rules are rules, but in a situation where the top four players all had the same score, letting them all advance to the finals would have made far more sense than eliminating Haliburton because he got off to a relatively slow start in a 30-second tiebreaker round. Haliburton, who tied the all-time high score with an opening round of 31 last year but did not win, again lost in agonizing fashion.


Damian Lillard, Milwaukee Bucks
Grade: A
Result: Champion (26/16/26)

The 3-point contest remains “Dame Time.” Going last as the defending champ, Lillard edged into a four-way tie by making all five of his attempts from the top and his last three moneyball shots. He spared us drama in the tiebreaker, making a deep 3 to help edge Haliburton, and then matched his first-round total for a win in the finals. This time, Lillard did sweat it out a bit, missing his first four tries from the right corner after matching Young’s total before knocking down his final attempt to repeat as champion.


Lauri Markkanen, Utah Jazz
Grade: B
Result: Eliminated first round (25)

Markkanen will rue his placement of the moneyball rack. Remarkably, the left wing he chose was the only rack on which Markkanen did not hit at least four shots. Markkanen got just two extra points by going 2-of-5 from his money rack, meaning he was eliminated despite making 19 of his 25 shot attempts.


Donovan Mitchell, Cleveland Cavaliers
Grade: C+

Result: Eliminated first round (21)

Wearing the jersey of his teammate Sam “Money” Merrill, who’s shooting 44% from 3-point range this season, Mitchell started by making just two of his five shots from the first two racks — including his moneyball rack. Mitchell heated up by making 4 of 5 from the top of the key, as well as his second deep attempt, but still wasn’t close to reaching the finals.


Karl-Anthony Towns, Minnesota Timberwolves
Grade: A-

Result: Eliminated in finals (26/16/22)

Like Lillard, Towns was bidding to win a second 3-point contest, which would have helped cement his claim as the greatest shooting big man in NBA history. After scoring 26 in the opening round, Towns set a strong pace in the tiebreaker round by making all five of his moneyball shots from the left wing and 4 of 5 from the left corner, scoring 16 points. Towns’ pace slowed in the finals, where he finished last of the three competitors.


Trae Young, Atlanta Hawks
Grade: A-

Result: Eliminated in finals (26/15/24)

After missing his first four shots of the opening rack, Young rarely missed the rest of the night, going 16-of-20 the rest of his first round — including 5-of-5 on his moneyball rack — to join the four-way tie for the top score. Young went 5-of-5 from a different moneyball rack on the left wing in the tiebreaker round, then put up a score of 24 in the finals that easily could have won the competition.


Skills contest

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1:15

Haliburton sinks half-court shot as Team Pacers win skills challenge

Tyrese Haliburton’s half-court shot helps Team Pacers take home the victory in the skills challenge.

Team Pacers (Tyrese Haliburton, Bennedict Mathurin, Myles Turner)
Grade: A

Result: Champion

Analysis
Feeding off their fans, the Pacers started out taking things seriously, with Turner and Haliburton posting the two fastest individual times in the relay, while Mathurin’s time also ranked in the top five. They worked overtime to win the tiebreaker and claim the passing competition, assuring a tie on points at worst. After finishing last in shooting, Indiana rallied to win the half-court shooting tiebreaker with All-Star Haliburton fittingly delivering the winning bucket.

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1:28

Haliburton caps off Round 1 of skills challenge with self alley-oop

Tyrese Haliburton seals Team Pacers’ first-round win with a self alley-oop in the skills challenge.


Team All-Stars (Scottie Barnes,Tyrese Maxey, Trae Young)
Grade: A-

Result: Runner-up

Analysis
After a poor start in the relay, when Maxey misunderstood where he was supposed to dribble and Barnes lost the ball out of bounds, the trio of All-Stars redeemed themselves in the next two competitions. They could have easily won the passing competition after strategizing where to target — they lost the tiebreaker by just two points — and run away from the field in terms of shooting with Barnes posting the best score of any player. Alas, the All-Stars couldn’t find the range from midcourt, needing more than a minute to finally make a shot and giving the Pacers too much time.


Team No. 1 picks (Paolo Banchero, Anthony Edwards, Victor Wembanyama)
Grade: D

Result: Third place

Analysis
From the start, the team of the past three No. 1 picks did not seem to take the challenge particularly seriously. Banchero went the wrong direction on the obstacle course shortly after Maxey made the same mistake. Then Edwards missed all three jumpers badly while shooting with his non-dominant left hand — forfeiting any chance at winning that round. The No. 1 picks finished a distant third in the passing competition before rallying somewhat to finish second in shooting.

RISING STARS


Team Jalen

Chet Holmgren, Oklahoma City Thunder
Grade: B

Game 1: 5 PTS | 2-4 FG | 3 REB | 1 AST
Final: 2 PTS | 0-0 FG | 2 REB | 1 BLK

Analysis
The top pick for Team Jalen didn’t end up playing the biggest role in his team’s victory. Holmgren had five turnovers in the semifinals, when he matched up with 2022 No. 1 pick Paolo Banchero and scored only at the free throw line in the final. On the plus side, Holmgren twice drove past Banchero on the perimeter, once for a running layup and the other drawing a foul.

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0:27

Chet Holmgren answers Paolo Banchero’s dunk with one of his own

Chet Holmgren throws up a two-handed windmill dunk after Paolo Banchero threw it down a possession before.


Jalen Williams, Oklahoma City Thunder
Grade: A-

Game 1: 2 PTS | 1-1 FG | 3 REB | 3 AST
Final: 5 PTS | 2-3 FG | 1-2 3PT | 3 AST

Analysis
Williams capably handled the role of point guard for the aptly named Team Jalen, handing out a game-high three assists in both the semifinals and the final. His only score in the semifinals was the team’s opening basket, starting a comeback from a 10-0 deficit. Williams also capped the night’s scoring with a pull-up 3 to reach — and actually surpass — the target score and win the tournament.


Bennedict Mathurin, Indiana Pacers
Grade: A

Game 1: 18 PTS | 7-13 FG | 2-4 3PT | 2 REB
Final: 4 PTS | 1-3 FG | 2 AST | 1 STL

Analysis
Mathurin redeemed himself for missing what could have been a pair of game-winning free throws by making a pull-up jumper to reach the target score in the tightly contested semifinal win. Of course, Team Jalen was in that position only because of Mathurin’s takeover, which earned him MVP honors.

Mathurin scored nearly half of his team’s points in the semifinals, repeatedly getting to the rim and making a pair of 3-pointers. Mathurin made less noise in the final, where his best play was a nifty flip pass to Kessler for a layup.


Jeremy Sochan, San Antonio Spurs
Grade: C+

Game 1: 0 PTS | 0-0 FG | 2 REB
Final: 0 PTS | 0-2 FG

Analysis
Playing on the perimeter as part of a supersized Team Jalen starting five, Sochan was the team’s only player not to score, missing both of his shot attempts.


Dereck Lively II, Dallas Mavericks
Grade: A

Game 1: 6 PTS | 3-3 FG | 2 REB
Final: 6 PTS | 3-3 FG | 1 AST

Analysis
Lively’s above-the-rim finishing and willingness to run the court were difference-makers for Team Jalen, which rallied from an early deficit soon after he checked into the semifinals. Lively quickly finished an alley-oop and was 6-of-6 from the field overall, all around the rim.


Jordan Hawkins, New Orleans Pelicans
Grade: A

Game 1: 7 PTS | 3-5 FG | 5 REB | 2 AST
Final: 5 PTS | 2-2 FG | 1-1 3PT | 2 AST

Analysis
Arguably the best shooter in this year’s rookie class, Hawkins showcased his skill with a pair of pull-up 3-pointers in transition and finished 5-of-7 during the competition. More impressive, however, was Hawkins’ playmaking. He found teammates Walker Kessler and Dereck Lively II for alley-oop finishes.


Walker Kessler, Utah Jazz
Grade: B

Game 1: 2 PTS | 1-1 FG | 2 REB | 1 AST
Final: 4 PTS | 2-2 FG | 1 REB

Analysis
It was a slow start for Kessler, who was actually called for an illegal screen in the semifinals — maybe the first in All-Star Weekend history. Kessler did have a powerful block in that game and a pair of finishes around the rim in the finals.


Team Detlef

Izan Almansa, G League Ignite
Grade: B+

Game 1: 2 PTS | 1-2 FG | 1 REB | 1 BLK
Final: 0 PTS | 1 MIN

Analysis
The 18-year-old Almansa, No. 24 in ESPN’s draft rankings, saw the least action of any player on Team Detlef. Almansa still found time for a memorable sequence in which he swatted Bilal Coulibaly’s shot, then raced downcourt for a dunk at the other end. Worse was Almansa’s decision to contest Victor Wembanyama in transition, setting up a three-point play.


Matas Buzelis, G League Ignite
Grade: B+

Game 1: 7 PTS | 3-7 FG | 2 REB | 2 AST
Final: 0 PTS | 0-3 FG | 0-1 3PT | 1 STL

Analysis

The highest-rated prospect on G League Ignite at No. 6 in ESPN’s rankings, Buzelis sent Team Detlef to the final by knocking down a difficult turnaround jumper after an extended offensive drought.

He also showcased his shotmaking by hitting a step-back jumper with a high release and a contested 3. That didn’t carry over to the final, where Buzelis missed all three of his shots and dribbled the ball off his foot for a turnover.


Emoni Bates, Cleveland Charge
Grade: B-

Game 1: 5 PTS | 2-6 FG | 2 AST | 1 STL
Final: 2 PTS | 1-3 FG | 2 REB | 1 AST

Analysis
Bates, who’s on a two-way contract with the Cleveland Cavaliers, was active throughout. He had an impressive finish in transition in the final and a long rainbow 3 off the dribble in the semifinals, when he also laid the ball off to teammate Oscar Tshiebwe for a dunk. Overall, however, Bates shot just 3-of-9 from the field.


Tyler Smith, G League Ignite
Grade: C+

Game 1: 2 PTS | 1-5 FG | 3 REB | 1 STL
Final: 0 PTS | 0-1 FG | 0-1 3PT

Analysis
Ranked 19th in ESPN’s draft rankings, Smith got his first look at Victor Wembanyama with mixed results. Wembanyama stole the ball from Smith while matched up one-on-one, then Smith later tried a hook shot over him and got predictable results with a wild miss.


Mac McClung, Osceola Magic
Grade: A-

Game 1: 12 PTS | 5-9 FG | 5 REB | 3 AST
Final: 0 PTS | 0-1 3PT | 3 AST

Analysis
It’s amusing that McClung, who will defend his title in Saturday’s dunk contest despite not being signed to an NBA contract (he’s playing for the G League’s Osceola Magic), scored a game-high 12 points in the semifinals without a single dunk. Instead, McClung relied on tough layup finishes. A miss after McClung was sent to the line for a three-shot foul delayed Team Detlef reaching the target score, but it got there in large part thanks to McClung’s energy, which produced three offensive rebounds and three assists. He again had three assists in the final.


Oscar Tshiebwe, Indiana Mad Ants
Grade: A

Game 1: 2 PTS | 1-1 FG | 8 REB
Final: 8 PTS | 4-5 FG | 2 REB | 1 AST

Analysis
Representing the hometown team on a two-way contract with the Pacers, Tshiebwe was in the mix throughout both games. He pulled down a game-high eight boards in the semifinals, including four of them at the offensive end. In the final, Tshiebwe found his footing as a scorer, making a tip-in to open the game, dunking home a pick-and-roll feed and completing a drop step for a layup.

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0:21

Oscar Tshiebwe throws down ridiculous poster slam

Oscar Tshiebwe stuns the announcers with an out-of-this-world poster dunk.


Alondes Williams, Sioux Falls Skyforce
Grade: A-

Game 1: 11 PTS | 5-10 FG | 1-6 3PT | 2 AST
Final: 3 PTS | 1-1 3PT | 1 REB | 1 BLK

Analysis
Recently signed to a two-way contract by the Miami Heat, Williams impressed with his all-around play in the semifinals. He went at Victor Wembanyama and came away with an and-1, then made a highlight dunk in transition when he pulled the ball back before finishing. Williams also hit a rainbow 3 over Wembanyama and was credited for a score when he attacked the offensive glass and got Wembanyama to tip the ball into his own basket, and. in the final, Williams had as many turnovers as points (three apiece).


Team Pau

Victor Wembanyama, San Antonio Spurs
Grade: A

Game 1:11 PTS | 5-6 FG | 7 REB | 2 BLK

Analysis

We can quibble with Wembanyama’s five turnovers, some of them the result of careless ball handling, but he still showcased the breadth of his one-of-a-kind skills.

Wembanyama made five of his six shot attempts, most of them around the rim. That included a transition dunk in which he waited for the defense to come to him, drawing an and-1 in the process.

The top pick of the 2023 draft then threw a lob to Jaime Jaquez Jr. after running pick-and-roll, grabbed a team-high seven rebounds and had a pair of blocks — one of them erasing a Mac McClung shot that could have ended the game.

play

0:19

Wemby throws down slam off pass from Podziemski

Brandin Podziemski lobs up the pass to Victor Wembanyama, who throws down the two-handed jam.


Brandon Miller, Charlotte Hornets
Grade: C

Game 1: 0 PTS | 0-4 FG | 2 REB | 2 STL

Analysis
The No. 2 overall pick from the 2023 draft has been hot lately, charging up our rookie rankings, but his shooting touch deserted him Friday. Miller missed all four of his shot attempts, including an air ball from 3 in transition that he salvaged by hustling back to steal an outlet pass.


Brandin Podziemski, Golden State Warriors
Grade: B+

Game 1: 3 PTS | 1-3 FG | 4 AST | 2 REB

Analysis
Thrust into the atypical role of point guard on Team Pau, Podziemski recorded a team-high four assists. He set up Victor Wembanyama with a nice entry pass and then had a drop pass to Bilal Coulibaly for a dunk. Podziemski’s only basket was a step-back 3.


Jaime Jaquez Jr., Miami Heat
Grade: A

Game 1: 6 PTS | 3-4 FG | 3 AST | 2 REB

Analysis
Jaquez’s strong rookie campaign carried over into Friday. A pump fake that set up a drive and dunk was the high point of a night that saw Jaquez make three of his four shot attempts and hand out three assists.


Jabari Smith Jr., Houston Rockets
Grade: B-

Game 1: 4 PTS | 2-4 FG | 1 REB

Analysis
Smith had just one board in nine quiet minutes. He scored two of his four points early, rising over his defender to knock down a jumper from the foul line.


Cason Wallace, Oklahoma City Thunder
Grade: B-

Game 1: 8 PTS | 3-8 FG | 2-6 3PT | 1 AST

Analysis
Team Pau repeatedly turned to Wallace in need of 3s down the stretch, and he went just 2-of-6 beyond the arc. One of those makes was a high-arcing shot from the corner. Wallace also converted his own steal into a mini-windmill dunk.


Bilal Coulibaly, Washington Wizards
Grade: B

Game 1: 4 PTS | 2-3 FG | 1 AST | 1 STL

Analysis
A patient drive for a layup followed by a strip for a steal in a key situation was Coulibaly’s best sequence. Unfortunately, he was on the wrong end of Izan Almansa’s highlight block.


Team Tamika

Paolo Banchero, Orlando Magic
Grade: B

Game 1: 5 PTS | 2-7 FG | 0-4 3PT | 3 REB

Analysis
Banchero helped Team Tamika’s dominant start with a reverse dunk in transition and had a nice driving dunk, but he struggled from beyond the arc. Banchero missed all four of his 3-point attempts, including a step-back that came up short of the rim. Banchero will have a chance to find his touch in Sunday’s All-Star Game.


Jaden Ivey, Detroit Pistons
Grade: A

Game 1: 8 PTS | 4-7 FG | 4 STL | 3 REB

Analysis
Ivey ended up on the wrong end of what turned into a one-on-one battle with Bennedict Mathurin, who was drafted one pick after Ivey in 2022, yet still acquitted himself well. Ivey was aggressive attacking the basket with power and scored eight points on 4-of-7 shooting in addition to recording a game-high four steals.


Jalen Duren, Detroit Pistons
Grade: C

Game 1: 2 PTS | 1-4 FG | 1 REB | 1 STL

Analysis
Duren, who is shooting 63% from the field, had his least accurate outing of the entire season (1-of-4). Duren’s sole basket came when he showed off his ballhandling ability in the open court for a dunk, and he had a nice pass to set up a missed corner 3, but for the most part it was a quiet night.


Keegan Murray, Sacramento Kings
Grade: B+

Game 1: 5 PTS | 2-4 FG | 3 REB | 2 AST

Analysis
Murray’s pull-up 3 in transition was part of Team Tamika’s 10-0 run to start the game. Although he scored only one other basket, Murray tied for team-high honors with three rebounds and two assists.


Scoot Henderson, Portland Trail Blazers
Grade: A

Game 1: 10 PTS | 4-6 FG | 1-2 3PT | 1 AST

Analysis
Playing in an unprecedented third consecutive Rising Stars game after representing G League Ignite the past two years, Henderson came out with energy, occasionally playing full-court defense on opposing ball handlers. He couldn’t finish a dunk after coming up with a steal, but he later completed an and-1 over Walker Kessler after getting to the rim with an impressive in-and-out dribble. Henderson’s 10 points led his team.


Keyonte George, Utah Jazz
Grade: B

Game 1: 2 PTS | 1-4 FG | 1 STL | 1 BLK

Analysis
By scoring a reverse finish over Jazz teammate Walker Kessler, George had one of the night’s most memorable highlights. That was George’s only field goal, as he missed all three tries beyond the arc. He did impress on defense, stealing a backdoor pass and stripping Bennedict Mathurin.


Vince Williams Jr., Memphis Grizzlies
Grade: B

Game 1: 3 PTS | 1-2 3PT | 2 AST | 1 STL

Analysis
A last-minute replacement for the injured Dyson Daniels, Williams made a pull-up 3 in transition for his only basket of the night.


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